Blood flow index using near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green as a minimally invasive tool to assess respiratory muscle blood flow in humans.

TitleBlood flow index using near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green as a minimally invasive tool to assess respiratory muscle blood flow in humans.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsGuenette, JA, Henderson, WR, Dominelli, PB, Querido, JS, Brasher, PM, Griesdale, DEG, Boushel, R, A Sheel, W
JournalAm J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol
Volume300
Issue4
PaginationR984-92
Date Published2011 Apr
ISSN1522-1490
KeywordsAdult, Electromyography, Female, Humans, Indocyanine Green, Male, Prospective Studies, Regional Blood Flow, Respiration, Respiratory Muscles, Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
Abstract

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with indocyanine green (ICG) dye has recently been used to measure respiratory muscle blood flow (RMBF) in humans. This method is based on the Fick principle and is determined by measuring ICG in the respiratory muscles using transcutaneous NIRS in relation to the [ICG] in arterial blood as measured using photodensitometry. This method is invasive since it requires arterial cannulation, repeated blood withdrawals, and reinfusions. A less invasive alternative is to calculate a relative measure of blood flow known as the blood flow index (BFI), which is based solely on the NIRS ICG curve, thus negating the need for arterial cannulation. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine whether BFI can be used to measure RMBF at rest and during voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea at 25, 40, 55, and 70% of maximal voluntary ventilation in seven healthy humans. BFI was calculated as the change in maximal [ICG] divided by the rise time of the NIRS-derived ICG curve. Intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscle BFI were correlated with simultaneously measured work of breathing and electromyography (EMG) data from the same muscles. BFI showed strong relationships with the work of breathing and EMG for both respiratory muscles. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) comparing BFI vs. the work of breathing for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.887 (P < 0.001) and 0.863 (P < 0.001), respectively, whereas the R(2) for BFI vs. EMG for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.879 (P < 0.001) and 0.930 (P < 0.001), respectively. These data suggest that the BFI closely reflects RMBF in conscious humans across a wide range of ventilations and provides a less invasive and less technically demanding alternative to measuring RMBF.

DOI10.1152/ajpregu.00739.2010
Alternate JournalAm. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
PubMed ID21289237
Grant List / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada